Tag Archives: Majid Ali MD

Who Is Dr. Majid Ali?

 

Professor Majid Ali, the founder of Ali Academia, is a humanist, physician, scientist, poet, story-teller, and the solo author of The Principles and Practice of Integrative Medicine (in 12 Volumes) and 26 other books. His original research work has been published in the Journal of Medical Association, Lancet, Cancer, Archives of Pathology, and many other international journals.

The following is an outline of his journey in search of what it means to be a human, and the meanings of suffering, ethics, truth, and enlightenment:

* A surgeon-turned-pathologiost

* A pathologist-turned-immunologist

* An immunologist-turned-ecologist

* An ecologist-turned-nutritionist

* A nutritionist-turned energy practitioner

* An energy practitioner-turned-philosopher

* A philosopher-turned-humanist

* A story teller

* A Poet

 

Dr. Ali’s Breakfast for Losing Weight, Reversing Diabetes, and Staying Healthy

 

Majid Ali, M.D.

A Breakfast for Insulin-Smart Eating and Healthful Aging

 


There is never a valid reason for missing breakfast. So strong is my conviction on the subjects of the need and the optimal type of breakfast that I seldom complete a visit with one of my patients without addressing it. Indeed, next to the subject of chronic anger I devote more time energy—and energy— to the matter of “Dr. Ali’s breakfast” than any other subject. In this chapter, I present information about what I consider to be a good breakfast and offer my reasons for my position on the subject.

Many patients tell me they missed their breakfast because they were not hungry. I explain that was so because their metabolic rhythm has been disrupted. Rising at 7 am following a dinner at 8 pm the evening before, of course, means a fasting of 11 hours. Fasting means hypoglycemia and acidosis. Extending that period for another two or three or more hours essentially sets a person up for major hypoglycemic-hyperglycemic shifts that trigger insulin and adrenergic roller coasters. In individuals with neurotransmitter volatility — persons with predisposition for anxiety, sadness, or depression — extension of fasting can trigger any or all of those symptoms. For others without such vulnerability, it is really a matter of time until they also succumb to undue tiredness or mood difficulties caused by glucose-insulin-adrenaline-neurotransmitter shifts.

During the mid-1960s, as a house surgeon in Pakistan and later in England, I seldom ate a breakfast. I am not sure why that was so. Perhaps it was a macho thing — the real surgeons had to begin their mornings with something better than merely engaging Pakistani Praathas (heavily oiled and salted fried pita bread) or English porridge. More often than not, lunch was missed as well. By noon, I was nearly always in the midst of struggle with excising tissues soaked with bloody fluids. Sometimes there was a quick cup of coffee during the midday hours. At other times, I devoured a doughnut or a piece of pastry in the early afternoon hours. Now when I recall those days, I shudder to think who might have paid what price for the lack of any sense of nutrition — appalling ignorance, to be precise — of a driven, hypoglycemic, and inexperienced surgeon.

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES OF A GOOD BREAKFAST

A wholesome breakfast — in my view — should serve the following goals:

1. It should set the stage for an active, vigorous, and healthful day with sustained energy.
2. It should support the functions of the bowel, liver, hormone organs, brain, and other tissue.
3. It should sustain the long-term goals of healthful aging and preventing degeneratory disorders, such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, osteoporosis, and others.

With those goals in mind, the following objectives of a breakfast seem desirable to me:

1. Overhydration of cells throughout the body during the morning hours;
2. Maintenance of the blood glucose levels within a narrow healthful zone to avoid rapid hypoglycemic- hyperglycemic shifts, and to prevent insulin-adrenergic roller coasters initiated by those shifts;
3. Tonification of the bowel musculature and stimulation of the emptying reflexes;
4. Provision of special support for the hepatic redox-restorative detoxification pathways;
5. Provision of restorative oils for optimal biomembrane functions, especially in the brain;
6. Provision of raw material for structural and functional proteins, especially for generating oxystatic enzymes; and
7. Avoidance of toxic trans fatty acids, which are common in the standard American breakfasts.

Below, I describe my own breakfast, which seeks to meet the above goals and objectives of an optimal breakfast.

My Own Breakfast 3-4 Days a Week

I consider missing my breakfast a violation of the sacred temple that houses my spirit — an insult to my physical frame. I learned that crucial lesson the hard way. Earlier I referred to the absence of breakfast during my surgical days. That mistake was continued during two decades of my pathology work as well. My clinical experience and review of literature has convinced me that the single best:

1. That the premium nutrient for the brain is flaxseed oil;
2. That the single best nutrient for the liver is lecithin;
3. That the most desirable prescription for the integrity of bowel ecology is organic vegetable juice;
4. That the ideal formulation for the prevention of sugar-insulin-adrenaline roller coasters is a good protein powder, comprising 85 to 90% partially digested proteins; and
5. That the nutrient of choice for invigorating all the cells in the body is abundant water.

In view of those considerations, I prepare my own breakfast (within two to three minutes) on five or six days a week as follows:

1. I begin with a 28-ounce mug filled with spring water and one ounce of seltzer water (seltzer water is unnecessary for those who prefer plain water).
2. I drink the above-mentioned fluid volume in portions of five to seven ounces at intervals, doing limbic exercise — non-competitive exercise—between drinking. I take my probiotic protocol (Bifidobacterium and Acidophilus) when I begin to drink water.
3. I continue drinking that amount of water, taking additional supplements, until the mug is empty.
4. Next, I prepare a 30-ounce protein drink as shown in Table 1.
5. I begin drinking the above protein protocol, again consume five to seven ounces at a time, continuing my limbic exercise and taking additional supplements until both the complement of supplements and the protein formula is finished.
6. On weekends, my wife and I commonly take an egg breakfast with some fruit.

At the Institute, my colleagues and I use the following four P&P (partially digested protein) protocols: (1) #1 containing %90% mixture of proteins derived from eggs and milk; (2) # 2 containing 90% soy proteins; (3) # 3 containing 75 to 80 % rice protein; and (4) # 4 containing about 90% of whey protein. Proteins derived from other sources, such as vegetables, may be substituted for one or the other of the above choices. In Table 2, I make some recommendations for the choice of vegetables for preparing fresh juices:

The flaxseed oil in the protein drink may be replaced by one of the following oils: olive, safflower, sunflower, sesame, pumpkin, avocado, and almond. Additional comments on this subject are included in the next section.

I use the Very Veggie brand of bottled organic vegetable juice produced by Knudson Co. For those who can find the time, freshly squeezed vegetable juice is clearly preferable.

 

 

Table 1. Dr. Ali’s Breakfast
Five Days of the Weeks


Protein                                    Two heaping tablespoons

Flaxseed                                  Two heaping tablespoons

Lecithin (all natural)                   One heaping tablespoon

Vegetable juice, organic              15 ounces

Water                                      15 ounces

 

Insulin-Smart Omelettes and Other Insulin-Smart Breakfasts for Insulin-Smart eating


When we do what is right, habit makes it agreeable. That certainly is true of eating choices. Taste is an acquired faculty. Organic vegetable juice added to my protein drink now appeals to me much more than any fruit juice. It was not so when I began. (Fried brain is not a delicacy for me now as it once was in my childhood in Pakistan.) The habit one grows into for one’s breakfast is as much a part of the life’s track as any other. I explain those basic aspects of a wholesome breakfast to every patient who consults me.

Some patients readily follow my breakfast plan closely, begin to savor it soon, and report good results within weeks. Others take a slower approach, adopting my plan partially. Some patients initially find my prescription for breakfast unappetizing. The majority of them settle into them nicely weeks or months later. Yet others ask if they can replace organic vegetable juice with milk (cow’s, goats, rice or soy). Others wish to add one-half of a banana or peach or other types of fruit for enhanced taste. Except in patients with disturbing symptomatology related to rapid hypoglycemic-hyperglycemic shifts, I accept their modifications.

I do wholeheartedly endorse an egg breakfast. Eggs have been maligned for decades by practitioners of pharmacologic medicine on the grounds that eggs raise blood cholesterol levels. I dismiss that as non-sense coming from ill-informed individuals. Not a single study has shown that eggs increase the incidence of cardiovascular disease. Indeed, some reports suggest that eggs — an excellent source of high-quality liver-friendly lecithin —actually lower blood cholesterol levels.

Plain yogurt with freshly ground flaxseed makes for an excellent breakfast. Some fruit may be added to that for persons without immune disorders. Other good breakfast options are soy products commonly recommended by macrobiotic enthusiasts.

Oatmeal breakfast used to be a favorite of nutritionists of bygone eras. Nearly all nutritionists that I have discussed this subject with in recent years told me they now do not recommend oatmeal or any other starch breakfasts anymore. I believe that is because the abuse of antibiotics and massive sugar overload in the general public has so stressed the bowel ecosystem that even so-called healthy starches now carry the hazard of further feeding the sugar- eaters in the gut and so contribute to ongoing disruption of the bowel ecology.

In some cultures, fish, poultry, and various meats are consumed for breakfast. Those items are very desirable as sources of proteins. The important point here is that such meats should not be highly processed, nitrated, or otherwise contain high contents of oxidized fats.

The Stress Related Male-Distribution Hair in Females – Majid Ali, M.D.

In 1958, in King Edward Medical College, Lahore, Pakistan, I first learned that stress causes hair loss in both genders. More than twenty years would pass before my female patients would teach me stress also contributes to male-distribution hair in females (hirsutism) with increasing frequency. Why the shift? I address this central question in this third article looking at the stress-adrenal-hirsuitism connection – male-distribution hair in females being the core abnormality in hirsutisms.

Oxygen is the king of human biology, insulin its minister of energy and metabolism. So in my model of integrative medicine, I look at all chronic disorders through the prisms of oxygen homeostasis and insulin regulation. In two previous articles on the subject in this journal, I considered the matter of male-distribution hair in females (hirsutism) in the broader contexts of The Oxygen Model of Disease and The Insulin-Toxicity of Disease. In this third article, I briefly explore the next level of study of hair health: the stress-hair connection.

The very mention of unwanted hair (hirsuitism) brings up the matter of excess male hormones (hyperandrogenism) of ovarian or adrenal origin. This view completely ignores toxicities of foods, environmental, and thoughts that form the basis of hirsuitism, except in uncommon caes of in-born errors of metabolism, such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The spreading epidemic of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common visible feature is facial and chest hair in girls and young women, reinforces this view. PCOS, however, is not rooted in ovaries and cysts are usually absent in the early and intermediate stages of the disorder.

Stress, Hirsutism, and Electrologists

What is stress? Be-Aware-Living is my term for a life lived in a way of one’s own choosing. I introduced the term Beware-Living for a life lived with a script written by others. In Be-Aware-Living is breathing one’s own air, observing one’s surrounding by one’s own senses, and heeding one’s own inner voices—in harmony and equilibrium with one’s own core of an enlightened life. Beware-Living is living is a life of recycles past and feared future miseries. In this perspective of Be-Aware and Beware-Living, I consider chronic stress as the state of dominance of the Beware mode. For reader interested in an in-depth treatment of this view of chronic stress, I offer seminars 3 and 4 of Dr. Ali’s Course on Stress (downloadable from http://www.aliacademy.org.)

The Stress-Hair Connection

In deliberations of the biochemical pathways which underpin the pathoegensis of hirsuitism, following are the main issues:

1. Excess production of androgens in adrenal response to chronic stress
2. Changes in the production of steroid hormone binding globulin (SHBG) which increases the levels of free testosterone and related androgens.
3. Stress-caused disturbances of the adrenal-pituitary-hypothalamus axis
4. Increased 5-reductase enzyme activity in peripheral issues as appears to be the case in the so-called idiopathic hirsutism.

As Roots Are to Roses, The Bowel to the Hair

The above subtitle is the simple truth about hair health which my patients taught me. Local hair appplications of castor oil, amla oil, and coconut oil can be very helpful. Short-term use of dandruff shampoo are useful as well. However, the real health, texture, and robustness of hair depends on the integrity of the bowel ecology. For furtrher reading I suggest my free Adrenal Health Course and free Bowel Health Course available at http://www.drali.org.

What Is Disease? A State of Evolution in Reverse

 

Majid Ali, M.D.

Disease is a state of separation from one’s nature. In scientific terms, it is a state of evolution in reverse. Our ancestors were fermenting microbes. Nature evolved an oxygen-governed high-efficiency system of cellular energetics. At an energetic level, disease being evolution in reverse means that human cells are metabolically degraded to a fermenting mode, usually starting in the bowel. Less commonly, disease begins with fermentation in the brain that reveals itself as persistent disappointments, anger, even rage.

Who is most vulnerable to disease? My answer: children. This answer might surprise many. We know children grow up fast. They heal their wounds much faster than older people. They fight infections better. Their organs are more plastic and capable of responding to environmental changes better than those of the adults. They have higher levels of growth hormone and other hormonal systems that promote healing.

So why should they be vulnerable to disease more than older people. My answer: their healing abilities are being compromised more and more before they are born. Continuing and often serious metabolic and energetic abnormalities in the womb (see Toxic Womb State for more info) weaken their developmental and disease-fighting systems. Sadly, with increasing frequency, expecting mothers have one or more of the following:

* Nighttime low blood sugar (nocturnal hypoglycemia)

* Nighttime excess insulin (insulin toxicityt continued from daytime)

* Nighttime excess adrenaline (nocturnal hyperadrenergic state)

* Nighttime excess cortisol and related adrenal steroids (noctural adrenal overactivity)

* Nighttime low melatonin (nocturnal hypomelatoninemia)

* Nighttime neurotransmitter roller coaster

* Nighttime anxiety (continued from daytime stress)

What Can be Done?

While the society in general makes it difficult for people to counter many such influences, expecting parents make a huge difference. The mission of Childrens Health Corps (http://www.kids123.org) is to offer authentic health information untainted by corporate deceptions and idealogical distortions. Please go to my 1200-video You Tube encyclopedia for free, easy-to-reach, and simple-to-understand information. To search, Google “Majid Ali” and the subject of interest.

The Age of Shrinking Brains

Majid Ali, M.D.

The planet Earth is fermenting. Its inhabitants are fermenting. That includes fermenting humans.

Cellular fermentation is cellular energetic degradation, cellular sickening, and cellular shrinking. That, of course, means shrinking of human brains, first functionally, then structurally. The evidence of this staring at us, in the unborn babies, in toddlers, in children, in adults, and in the elderly. 

 

 

Shapes of Love

 

Majid Ali, M.D.

Love arrives with many faces and in different shapes. Some faces are well masked. Some shapes morph freely.

On April 26, 2014. Earlier I some images of purple balloons floated on a Connecticut beach by seniors of a local high school. They were remembering one of their class fellows: Maren. She was slashed to death by a knife at the hands of a student who wanted her as her school prom companion.
 

I cannot plumb the grief of Maren’s family at the news of her murder. Was that horror a matter of biology or an issue of psychology? Did Maren’s mom process this information at some lofty mental level? Or was her agony profoundly organic? A dark, dark face of profound maternal bonding?

I do not have access to information about Maren’s murderer. What might have enraged one of Maren’s class fellows so as to drive him to her murder? What substances might have been flowing through his blood at that time? Was that a matter of biology or psychology?

A return to my questions in the beginning of this article: A young woman takes a look at her first newborn and experiences intense bonding. Is that a matter of biology or an issue of psychology? Does this bonding arise from months of shared biology or created by some elements of psychology? I am content letting the reader decide how does love fit into the theme of this series

Guru’s Love for the Disciples

History of “gurudoms,” has a harsh indictment for love of gurus for their disciples. It is never uncoditional love, not for too many years anyway. In the end it always degenerates into control of the followers by the guru. The most horrendous episodes of cruelty, torture, and crimes nearly always started with a man—woman rarely could match the evil of men in this field—who successfully cast themselves in the roles of gurus and saviors. Who do I allude to here? What biologic-pathologic conditions were they victims of? I leave these questions to the reader’s mind.

Practitioners’ Love for Patients Is Uneven Love

By “uneven love,” I do not mean uncoditional love. Clearly, some funds will be transfered from the patient to the practitioner, and that is the condition of that love.

Politicians’ Love for Voters

Whose love has been more dangerous in the history – gurus’ love for disciples or politician’s love for voters? Of course, the answer depends upon the readers’ choice of politicians and gurus, in the past or the present.

A Candle’s Love for Anxiety

Have you ever loved a candle? Have you ever experienced the love of a candle? How can you love a candle if you have never tried it? Have can you experience the love of a candle if you have never tried it? Please do not ask me to explain. This is one of the things that cannot be explained. It can only be done, known, and understood.

A Stone Solves the Anxiety problem

Have you ever asked a stone to solve the anxiety problem? Have you ever experienced the love of a stone? How can you love a stone if you have never tried it? Have can you experience the love of a stone if you have never tried it? What stone do I speak about? Where do you find such a stone? Next time you are in a field or a park, or simply walking anywhere, please pick up a stone, take it home, wash it if necessary, and put it where it can keep an eye at you.

 

Anxiety, Love, Biology, and Psychology

 

Majid Ali, M.D

 

 

A young woman takes a look at her first newborn and experiences intense bonding. Is that a matter of biology or an issue of psychology? Does this bonding arise from months of shared biology or created by some elements of psychology? For an answer, we need to consider what psychology is. Here is what, according to Wikipedia, psychology is: “Psychology is an academic and applied discipline that involves the scientific study of mental functions and behaviors. ” So, is the instant mother-baby bonding (and love) the result of shared biology or application of some mental functions and behavior by either of the two?

What Is Love?

Love is a tedious subject. It is best to resist the temptation to write about it. Still many of us cannot do so. Here are some words on the subject taken from my book “Drone Democracy” (available as a download from http://www.aliacademy.org):

Love

Love is to celebrate,
A crystal without creed,
A dew drop without color,
A raven without race,
A river without religion

Love is to be,
A Muslim on Fridays,
A Jew on Saturdays,
A Christian on Sundays,
A Hindu on Mondays,
A Buddhist on Tuesdays,
An agnostic on Wednesdays,
A nobody on Thursdays.

What day,
Makes my day?
Might it be a Thursday?
A day to be a nobody.
 

Thursday,
A day for,
The language of silence,
The commerce of compassion.
A day to live,
A day to love,
A day to be true,
Giddy on life,
A day to be a nobody.

Thursday,
A day for,
For trancing in every shrine,
Far, far,
From the mind of the malign,
Softly, sublimating,
Into the heart of the Divine.
A day for love,
A love,
That only soul can refine.
On the way to be a nobody.

****

Does anybody ever become a true nobody?

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